Ike

Ike

Hello everyone! I’m hijacking Mom’s blog to again get you up-to-date with the latest from the barn without Mom’s biased opinion obscuring the truth. You all know that she just doesn’t get things right sometimes. Poor clueless woman. I hope I don’t get in trouble for saying that!

Anyhoo, this has been a winter unlike any of the other two winters I have experienced. There have been numerous days where I don’t get to go out in my paddock at the usual time because of this white stuff that hides the grass. It is an odd substance that the humans seem to dislike a lot. The night before it came, they even took the gates off the hinges. I thought that they’d decided to let us have free roam of the barnyard so that we could eat the tasty grass on the other side of the fence, but no, after the white stuff covered the ground, Mr. D drove the tractor around, and then they put the gates back on. Shucks! I thought my brother and I were really going to get to play rather than improvising over the hotwire.

I pushed the white stuff around with my nose. Ms. C told me I looked like a big anteater. Not sure what an anteater is or if I want to be compared to one. What I can tell you is that the white stuff does not taste like grass. I tried eating it a few times just to make sure I was right. It is just cold and tasteless. I also tried rolling in it just like my big brother. Not impressed. I think I’m glad I had my blanket on when I rolled. The best thing about the white stuff is that I don’t have to work when the white stuff is on the ground, so I have had a lot of time to hang out. Mom says that I’m like a kid who has been home from school for too long; she says that I’m “stir-crazy” and need to get back to work. I think she is the one that is crazy.

I did have another new experience this winter. My best buddy Dooda left the barn one day and didn’t come back. I knew that he wasn’t feeling well even before everyone else did. He was very sweaty and rolled in his stall the night before. I stretched my neck out as far as I could, but I still couldn’t see him when he lay down. I think he belly hurt and the pain just kept getting worse. It made me very worried and I spent my day checking on him. Mom cried when she came to the barn. She told me that Dooda might be joining Lancaster on the other side of the rainbow bridge. She told me that Dooda would not be in pain anymore. I usually don’t say much when horses come and go from the barn, but I did whinny to my buddy as he walked away. He nickered back. I’m not going to tell you what he said. That is between the two of us.

After Dooda left, the whirling dervish Sophie moved into Doo’s stall. I like her just fine, but she is a girl and doesn’t get me like Dooda did. At least she doesn’t try to bite me like the other girls at the barn.

And, finally, I know my Mom has told you all about her fall, but you need to know the facts. She told you that a bird scared me, but she didn’t tell you how creepy the bird was. He looked like a prehistoric creature with its wings spread. It just sat on the fence pole motionless even when I stared at it. It was humongous! When it starting flapping its wings, I knew I had to get away from it really fast. I was trying to save myself and my Mom. Pretty sure that it would have eaten me if I hadn’t run. In my panic, I bucked. How was I to know that Mom would fly like she did? She doesn’t have wings like that bird. Mom didn’t even come to rescue me when the reins got wrapped around my leg. She just lay on the ground like a pile of poo. She left the barn with Ms. C and didn’t even come to say goodbye. Sheesh! Good thing that Mr. D was there to take care of me. My brother Cigar gave me a secret high-five later that day; he thought my feat was pretty impressive. Don’t tell Mom though, because she doesn’t like when I take advice from Cigar.

So there you have it – straight from the horse’s mouth. Feel free to ask me anything. You can count on me to tell you the whole truth.

Ike